Our next webinar is scheduled for Thursday November 9th, 2017 at noon eastern, featuring Dr. Natalie L. Cápiro.

SiREM’s webinar series features guest speakers who are subject matter experts to provide the latest information on technology advances in environmental remediation and site characterization. The webinars will combine recent research and development activities for new and emerging contaminants and technologies with real word applications to characterize and remediate contaminated sites.

We hope you will join us for our next webinar:

New Insights into the Coupling of Thermal Treatment and Microbial Reductive Dechlorination for Improved Remediation of Chlorinated Ethenes

Dr. Natalie Cápiro (Research Assistant Professor, Tufts University) will discuss the synergistic implementation of thermal treatment with microbial reductive dechlorination.  Combining these technologies has a high potential for achieving more timely, cost-efficient closure of contaminated sites, however, the mechanisms responsible for the improved microbial degradation of chlorinated solvents observed during or following thermal treatment are not fully understood.  Dr. Cápiro will present the most likely reasons for the observed benefits and present data from a study where a series of laboratory-scale column studies was completed using KB-1® to assess the impacts of thermal treatment on subsurface geochemistry and the resulting effects on the microbial population.

Jeff Roberts (SiREM) will close out the webinar with a discussion of the products and services that SiREM has to support combined thermal treatment with enhanced in situ bioremediation projects.

REGISTER HERE

Abstract:

The targeted, synergistic implementation of thermal treatment with microbial reductive dechlorination shows high potential for achieving more timely, cost-efficient closure of contaminated sites by mitigating weaknesses of each standalone technology. However, the mechanisms responsible for the improved microbial degradation of chlorinated solvents observed during or following thermal treatment are not fully understood. There are many possible explanations, but two stand out as the most likely: 1) increased substrate availability in the aqueous phase, and 2) direct temperature stimulation of the microbial population. Dechlorinating bacteria require electron acceptors (e.g., chlorinated ethenes), electron donors, vitamins, and carbon to maintain cellular growth and activity. Thermal treatments cause chlorinated ethenes to desorb from the solid phase, but research also suggests that soil heating can lead to increased concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, potentially improving microbial access to bioavailable carbon and fermentable electron donor sources. Thermal treatment may also directly stimulate dechlorinating bacteria. The average groundwater temperature in the United States ranges from 3 °C in parts of Maine and Minnesota to 25 °C in southern Florida and Texas, but all known dechlorinating bacteria are mesophilic, with optimal growth temperatures as high as 38 °C, as determined by batch culture studies. In this current study, a series of laboratory-scale column studies was completed, utilizing KB-1® as the inoculating culture, to assess the impacts of thermal treatment on subsurface geochemistry and resulting effects on the microbial population, as well as the effects of direct temperature stimulation of dechlorinating bacteria in dynamic flow systems.

The Presenters:

Research Assistant Professor, Natalie L. Cápiro, Ph.D., Tufts University

Dr. Natalie Cápiro is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Tufts University. Prior to coming to Tufts, Dr. Cápiro completed her postdoctoral studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology, M.S. and Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University, and B.S. in Biological and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. Dr. Cápiro’s research interests include applied environmental biotechnology, fate and transport of traditional and emerging contaminants in natural systems, development of innovative in situ remediation approaches, and nanotechnology-biological interactions in the environment. Her work is supported by funding from the National Science Foundation and the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), including a study that won the 2012 SERDP Environmental Restoration Project of the Year.

Jeff Roberts, M.Sc., Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo.

Jeff is a Senior Manager at SiREM with extensive technical experience in the laboratory assessment and field implementation of soil, sediment and groundwater remediation technologies at sites containing contaminants including chlorinated solvents, petroleum hydrocarbons and other recalcitrant compounds. Over the past fifteen years he has conducted and managed hundreds of bench-scale batch and column treatability studies. He also has technical experience in the growth, scale up and field implementation of several anaerobic microbial cultures for bioremediation remedies.

To view previously recorded webinars click here.